Public Art Proposal Display

Art Proposals for Fire Station #35 Public Art Opportunity

FS35.jpgThe San Francisco Arts Commission is conducting a selection process to choose artwork for new Fire Station #35 at Pier 22 ½. The Fire Station will consist of a new two-story fire boat station, which will be built on top of a steel float and anchored by six guide piles. San Francisco Fire Department's three fireboats and rescue watercraft will be moored at the new floating facility. The goal of the artwork is to enhance the planned space and highlight the history and operations of the station and the fireboats. The artwork may also include reference to the fire boats’ importance in the aftermath of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. The artwork will also align with the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission’s Public Access Design Guidelines for the San Francisco Bay. Four artists were chosen as finalists by a Selection Panel to create site-specific proposals for Fire Station #35: Hood Design Studio Inc, Lead Pencil Studio, Mark Reigelman, and Adrien Segal.

Bow

Walter Hood

Board Hood Design_sm.jpgBOW : something shaped in a curve

The overlook platform is inspired by its setting adjacent to the historic Fire Station #35 and the SF Bay Bridge.

Bow - the curved shaped associated with the front of a boat is multi-dimensional in its interpretation. As a sculpture, it can be experienced from all around and from within. It is a homage to the fire boats and their role in the cultural history of the City of San Francisco and Bay, especially regarding their significant contributions during and after the Loma Prieta Earthquake. The commemorative collage at the keel focuses the experience of the overlook on the Fire Station history and narratives from citizens who experienced the earthquake.

“Being out on the water with the crew of Fire Station #35, I was fascinated with how the crew navigates through the bay, using depth charts without the reference of built objects. In a similar manner, BOW is a sculpture to showcase and commemorate the unseen cultural histories of the fireboats in the City of San Francisco.”

BOW serves as both a visually striking element along the Embarcadero and the Bay, an overlook and a resting place.

At the edge of the pier deck, BOW sticks out…overlooking the old and new fireboats, the bay, and bridge. From the Embarcadero, it appears to be pulled out onto the sidewalk, inviting people onto the collaged overlook. A simple, assessible ramp brings people from the sidewalk to the overlook providing a place for people to enjoy the spectacular bay views and the daily operations of the fire boats of Fire Station #35. Terrace seating forms an inner cove for informal gatherings looking back toward the city. The surrounding concrete pier deck will have large-scale navigational charts sandblasted to create a variegated surface.

BOW features at its center a series of glass panels that combine images and quotations to illuminate the cultural importance of Fire Station #35. The collage layers historic images of fireboats, historic maps and the Bay, with narratives from citizens who experienced the Loma Prieta Earthquake and the life of the crew of Fire Station #35. Serving as backdrops to BOW are the new Fire Station #35, the Bay and the Bridge. The effect is a three-dimensional living collage that showcases Fire Station #35 and its role in shaping the cultural landscape and history of the city.

The sculpture itself is 36’ x 35’ x 24’. The piece is made from 3”x1” galvanized tube steel, coated with a Tnemec finish. The guardrail which extends out to the sidewalk edge and the keel, the main structural element, are made from 6”x 2” galvanized tube steel, with a Tnemec finish. The ramp is black integral color concrete with mica flecks, a typical concrete finish in the City of San Francisco. The glass collage display is crafted from curved Sentry Glass laminating images and quotes. The surrounding concrete pier deck will be sandblasted with images from navigational charts, preferably at the time of pier deck construction, to maximize the efficiency of installation.

We are aware of and have researched the “Remembering the Loma Prieta Earthquake” website where stories are collected online. We are interested in collaborating with them and/or collecting stories through our own engagement process that would involve the crew of Fire Station #35, the Guardians of the City Museum and other stakeholders in the project.

View a larger image of the proposal.

Sunlight Threshold

Lead Pencil Studio

lps_presentation board.jpgAs all new buildings and marine structures are constructed, they enter into the ever-expanding tapestry of civic infrastructure. City firefighters must absorb these new structures, regardless of their size or configuration and understand how to protect them and their inhabitants should a disaster ignite. The firefighters of Station #35 are no exception, and although it does have a small fire engine to fight landbased fires, it is mostly viewed as a defender of marine structures via its notorious fleet of waterpumping ships. The most significant fire fought from Station #35 was a 15 hour pumping operation for the Marina District apartment fire over two miles away and two blocks from shore following the 1989
earthquake. The team of fire fighters from Station #35 are a crew with an unusually diverse skillset - with their role to protect life and preserve structures from the spread of devastating fires on land as well as sea.

With the Station #35’s unique location below the spectacular Bay Bridge and at the natural terminus for the high pedestrian volumes along the Embarcadero esplanade, we are taking the unusual position of creating an artwork that celebrates the broader role of the firefighters as an arrival of hope during a crisis. These firefighters enter built structures– whether boats, floating homes, buildings along the water, or apartments situated blocks inland from the water - to save lives and preserve structure and property at the incredible risk to themselves. For the men and women who have chosen this profession, passing through the doorway of a burning building is not a minor act of courage.

Pausing on that act, our sculpture focuses on the universal condition of passing through an architectural threshold – an ordinary act which becomes a profound moment in the context of a firefighter. Entering a burning structure to save lives is among the most dangerous and hopeful acts of civil service. Sunlight Threshold seeks to memorialize the significance of that moment. We hope that viewers will approach this sculptural doorway with the Bay Bridge framed in the background and consider the significance of crossing the threshold from safety into an inferno.

The iconography of this artwork is intended to suggest a spatial outline or drawing-in-space of a structure and with the adjacency to Fire Station #35. The color of this artwork will be golden, similar to the polished brass found on the ships. The combined visual elements of golden color, architectural structure, building detail and a stairway are specifically designed to invite viewer participation. Depending on the viewer’s position the Sunlight Threshold will frame the great city that has overcome many adversities or the sweeping view of the bay, both of which Fire Station #35 has and continues to protect.

View a larger image of the proposal. 

The Bay Star

Mark Reigelman

Reigelman_Display_Board_Final2.jpgConceptual overview:

San Francisco’s famous waterfront asset, the embarcadero pedestrian way, Is slated to become home to one of the most transformative and technologically advanced fireboat stations in the country. The project consists of a glass and metal clad fire station floating on the San Francisco bay directly behind the historic fire station near the embarcadero promenade.  Just north of the historic fire station will be an overlook connected to the new fire station offering splendid views of the built and natural environment and an opportunity for award-winning public art. Welcome to the home of the bay star.

Because of the utility and history of San Francisco fireboats the artwork needs to represent aspects of fire station #35, capture the essene of the awesome natural resources surrounding this built environment and represent the civic members lost during the region’s most tragic times. Visually, the bay star utilizes a traditional fireboat tool, firehose nozzles, in order to create a new identity. By enlarging, dissecting and reassembling this quintessential structure, the bay star creates a dynamic architectural shape that references the natural wonders of the San Francisco bay and surrounding environment. In addition to the large bronze sculpture there will be bronze text embedded into the ground plane offering visitors an educational component which will include the names of community members that were lost during the Loma Prieta earthquake and stories about this devastating occurrence and the heroism that followed. The seemingly precarious yet extremely technical approach balanced with the warmth of color and iconic shape creates a powerful, uplifting and memorable experience for pedestrians that highlights the areas unique fireboat history while highlighting the awe-inspiring views of the bay.  

Conceptual narrative

Concept: 
Three elements must be present for a fire to ignite; fuel, heat and oxygen. It is the essentiallness of each of these elements, and their combined power, that creates foundation for my artwork proposal, the bay star.  The bay star highlights three unique facets of San Francisco fireboat history - firstly, the artwork utilizes a quintessential fireboat element, fireboat nozzles, to create its core identity and experience. Secondly, by strategically repeating and arranging the fireboat nozzles the artwork is able to capture an aquatic aesthetic while highlighting the natural environment, the San Francisco bay, which makes fire boating possible and experience of the area awe-inspiring. Finally, the artwork represents the community members that were lost during the Loma Prieta earthquake while emphasizing the essentialness of fireboats like the phoenix. Together, fire boat identity, symbolism of the natural environment and the representation of our civic members combine to create the bay star. 

Materials: 
I chose to work with polished bronze as the primary material of the bay star. Logistically, this material has proven itself as an ideal candidate for low maintenance and longevity in coastal regions and conceptually and experiencially, this material strongly references the brass detailing commonly used in fire equipment while resulting in a visual experience that is positive and uplifting. In additional to the large bronze sculpture, like rays of sun, there will be lines of bronze text embedded into the ground plane and emanating from the sculpture providing passersby information about the unique fireboat history and memorializing community members that perished in the Loma Prierta earthquake. The final artwork will reference the historical, cultural and natural attributes of the setting while complimenting the materials and shapes used in the adjacent built and natural environment. The bay star will be a constructed using a combination of cast, welded and polished bronze with a structural stainless steel interior armature that will be secured to a structural concrete footer. 

Lighting:
While the polished bronze material will offer incredible daytime experiences it is important that the artwork has nighttime presence as well. In addition to embedded ground lighting the artwork will have led’s embedded in the artwork core and within each of the bronze nozzles so at night the entire sculpture will vibrantly pulse along the shoreline. 

Colors: 
a polished bronze was selected because of its limited maintenance and excellent longevity but also because of its warm golden hue. This vibrant and enduring color will compliment the local architecture, highlight the natural environment and enhance the views of the San Francisco bay. 

Location: 
The bay star will be installed on the waterfront where Harrison st. And the embarcadero pedestrian way intersect. At this intersection is a newly designed pier with an overlook nestled between the San Francisco bay and fire station #35’s vehicle pathway. The artwork will be situated in the center of this overlook area which allows for great visibility from all angles and for various modes of transport. This location offers incredible views of the waterfront, the bay bridge and the San Francisco bay.

View a larger image of the proposal. 

Becalmed

Adrien Segal

Segal Fire Station 35 SFAC_BOARD.jpgPROJECT PARAMETERS

To create a visually compelling public artwork to be installed on a new observation deck in front of Fire Station 35 on the Embarcadero in San Francisco. The artwork will not block bay views, will invite visitors, will reference the history and operations of the Fire Station, and will honor the Loma Prieta Earthquake event.

The overall dimensions of the proposed artwork is 4’ x  26’ x 20’.
The maximum weight is 250 pounds per square foot, evenly distributed.

CONCEPT PROPOSAL

The public artwork proposed for Fire Station 35 has three elements - a physical sculpture, a sound element, and graphic features - that set the tone and historical context for the experience of the artwork.

Physical Sculpture – Water Arc / The central form is a monolithic water arc inspired by the ephemeral turbulence and force of water spray of the SFFD fireboats, and also by its transition to a gentle mist of water as it falls back to the ocean. The arc is a unique, highly crafted concrete sculpture that also serves as seating. The carved texture will appear like stone - it will have smooth polished areas where visitors can find a space for rest and contemplation while they take in unobstructed views of the bay.

Sound Element / The San Francisco Fire Department has a long history of fireboat operation dating back to 1909. Each fireboat has a bell, which will be recreated in bronze and permanently installed in the guard rail surrounding the observation deck. The gentle ringing of the historic bells will be activated by the ocean tides, connecting the visitor to the fireboats and the natural environment through sensory acoustic experience.

Graphic Features / The ground beneath the sculptural arc contains three graphic features that set the historic context and tone for the artwork. A rippling wave pattern grounds the sculpture visually and symbolically, and brings continuity to the site-specific phenomena of seismic waves, ocean waves, and the sound waves of the bells. The bronze inlay pattern of stars memorialize the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake event. These are encircled by a poem, written by a historic ship captain titled “Becalmed” which brings a sense of stillness and contemplation to the artwork.

View a larger image of the proposal. 

Opportunity For Public Comment

Please take a few minutes to review the conceptual proposals for Fire Station #35 and complete a comment form below. You may also email your comments to sfacpublicartcomment@sfgov.org, or hand deliver/mail comments to 401 Van Ness Avenue, Room 325 by January 23, 2018, 5 p.m.

The Final Selection Panel meeting will take place on Friday, January 25, 2018, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. at 401 Van Ness Avenue, Room 302. All Artist Selection Panel meetings are open to the public. An agenda for the meeting will be posted 72-hour in advance of the meeting on SFAC’s website under the Public Meeting section: www.sfartscommission.org/calendar.

What's Coming Up

Public Meeting

Advisory Committee of Street Artists and Crafts Examiners

April 07
/
1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125
Public Meeting

Advisory Committee of Street Artists and Crafts Examiners

April 07
/
1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125
Public Meeting

Advisory Committee of Street Artists and Crafts Examiners

April 07
/
1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125
Public Meeting

Advisory Committee of Street Artists and Crafts Examiners

April 07
/
1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

War Memorial Bldg | Rm 125